Rwanda Culture and Literature

Rwanda Culture and Literature

Following the bloody civil war little is left of the ancient traditions. The craftsmanship, rather simple, is based on ceramics and the manufacture of baskets, while the art of painting and sculpture has always been little practiced. Art and music have managed to maintain a certain continuity; the wandering players are no longer as many as they used to be, while listening to the music in the clubs and the recorded one. The dance tradition is particularly rich; the training of young male Tutsis at the royal court included a form of martial dance involving the use of percussion and demonstrations of skill by individual dancers. This type of dance was maintained even after the disappearance of the monarchy through a national company that is supported by the government, based in Nyanza; these traditional dances are also taught in schools. Other kinds of dances, performed in public ceremonies, continue to be performed at weddings and other circumstances. The typical dishes of Rwanda are quite simple; the most used ingredients are beans, bananas, sweet potatoes, potatoes and sorghum. Milk derivatives are also widely consumed, such as a particular drink based on curdled milk. Those who can afford it also eat meat, especially beef, goat and poultry. Sorghum and banana beer is widespread. In the past, food was only eaten at home; the taboo of eating in public has almost disappeared, however, and there are now several restaurants in urban areas. The importance of the as a particular drink based on curdled milk. Those who can afford it also eat meat, especially beef, goat and poultry. Sorghum and banana beer is widespread. In the past, food was only eaten at home; the taboo of eating in public has almost disappeared, however, and there are now several restaurants in urban areas. The importance of the as a particular drink based on curdled milk. Those who can afford it also eat meat, especially beef, goat and poultry. Sorghum and banana beer is widespread. In the past, food was only eaten at home; the taboo of eating in public has almost disappeared, however, and there are now several restaurants in urban areas. The importance of the clan has shrunk dramatically within society; despite this, however, many Rwandans still do not feed on the totemic animals associated with their clan.

LITERATURE

According to campingship, Rwanda boasts an ancient original oral literature, of an encomiastic character, the work of a and professionals, divided into three main genres: heroic, pastoral and dynastic poetry. The first, which in turn is divided into lyric poetry (icivugo) and epic (igitekerezo), constitutes one of the sources of the country’s history. The pastoral poem sings the praises of the Cow considered as an Amazon armed with two javelins (her horns). Dynastic poetry, or igisigo, is the ancient genre: it sings the merits of kings and high characters. They were authors aedi professionals, court officials gathered in guilds, who handed down from father to son the profession and the poems themselves, which were learned by heart. There were also unofficial rhapsodies, real wandering minstrels. This literature has been transmitted to us thanks to the work of translator and essayist of A. Kagame (1912-1981), the most important figure in the literary, religious, historical and philosophical fields. He was responsible for an authentic masterpiece, the pastoral poem written in the Chinese language Rwanda Astrida Rwanda (1952), transposition of Genesis in Rwandan style and philosophy. Also noteworthy are the research and documentation works on ancient literature carried out by Th. Kamanzi, C. Rugamba and L. Nkongori. Between 1970 and 1990 various writers used the KinyaRwanda language for modern works (C. Rugamba, L. Kamali, C. Kamugunga, JC Nsabimana). Compared to literature in the local language, that in French appears scarce, also due to the insufficient teaching of this language. However, a prominent name is remembered, that of the narrator SJ Naigiziki, who achieved international fame with two lively stories, between the serious and the buffoonish, and a comedy. The best known poets were Cyprien Rugamba and JB Mutabaruka, who sang the sadness of exile. In the theatrical field, the works of T. Kabeja, L. Ndasingwa, J. Ntirushwa are interesting. We also mention the novelist PC Katerpilari, the essayists EL Gasarabwe, scholar of Rwandan epics and folklore, and J. Habibwami, P. Kawuma historical-political authors. Rwandan writer Benjamin Sehene (b.1959), who lived first in Canada and then in France, traveled to his native country during the civil war. He then narrated his testimony in his work Le Pi├Ęge Ethnique (1999).

Rwanda Culture